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COVID-19 Statement from the CEO of Red Scarf Equestrian: Let’s Carry On

While the words are not those of Winston Churchill, and, indeed, were nowhere to be found during the Second World War having been discovered just twenty years ago or so in a bookshop in the northeast of England, the now famous motto “Keep Calm and Carry On” nevertheless has come to be associated with the spirit of the British people. My Mother, whom I introduced you to in my first blog post of January 24, 2020, used the expression “Carry On” often as we grew up. I am sure she herself heard it often from her Mother, my Granny Doris, as they faced daily living in war time England. As a girl I heard it, for example, when I went...

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An Outlander Inspired Woolen Skirt for Everyday Adventures

When you watch Claire and Jamie of the television series Outlander ride bareback together, so deeply in love, on a Scottish horse on the Scottish heath set in the mid-eighteenth century, the wind in their faces, the breathtaking scenery flowing by with the wind, you might wonder if you could be forgiven for wanting to escape the everyday to be riding there, too, at that same time and in that same place, to ride and just keep riding. They, of course, in the series have their challenges like everyone else does, both then and in the mid 1940’s from which Claire has slipped through an irregularity in the cloth of time. Indeed, Claire has the peculiarly difficult circumstance of being...

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The Grey in Riding

In my last blog, What does progress look like?, I touched on how riders define progress and why it’s often an inaccurate representation of what is actually happening when they are in the saddle; how the checklists in our heads get rewritten and rewritten for every new stage in riding. I want, this time, to further explore and explain this idea because it relates directly to so many riders who ask the question, “What’s next?” Progress in riding is very unique to each rider and dependent on many factors. We tend to look at riding like this:  Walk (check) Halt (check) Steer (check) Trot (check) Canter (check) Jump (check) Jump higher (check)  If this were the case, my job as...

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The Importance of Origins in Both the Personal and the Corporate

I have just returned home from having a very enjoyable, and admittedly much needed, visit with my sisters. We packed as much fun into our brief time together as we possibly could: hiking, skiing, walks together along the frozen shoreline of the ocean. But for me, the best time of each day was near its close, in the evening, when, with glasses of wine in hand, we shared stories of our growing up years and then of our times apart as grown women, and the connections between the two. This recent visit got me thinking, however, about how our personal histories are so intimately intertwined with the histories and origins of our families. To my mind, our understanding of the...

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Every Horse Tells a Story: Horse Simulators at the Mall

Maybe it was the expression of wonder on the faces of small children that best captures the fun of the visit of the Horse Simulators to the Georgian Mall in Barrie, Ontario last week. In that moment when they first spotted them, eyes grew wide, little arms pointed, and mother or father were almost invariably asked if they could have a ride. Or, perhaps the fun was captured best by the look of curiosity as these same children came a little closer, the awe of discovering something new, that looked so entrancing, sketched on their faces? Or was it the smile that would simply not go away when they rode as far as their “mechanical horse” would take them? Or,...

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